iPhoneography

Most people associate photography with using a DSLR. However, people today are leaning more towards their smartphones to capture special moments because of its convenience. Popular social media platforms, such as Instagram and Facebook, have also helped increase the demand for using our smartphones.

Anyone can take a picture, but what elements qualify a picture to be “great”? There are many tips and tricks to taking outstanding pictures on your smartphone. Here, I will break down a few tips and tricks I use when taking iPhoneography.

1. Keep photos simple.

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2. Play with angles

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3. Use the Rule-of-Thirds and/or symmetry

    I rarely use this rule for iPhoneography (hence the lack of photo), but it is important to keep in mind. If you have never taking a photography class or have never studied photography on your own, then I highly recommend you read more into how to properly compose photographs. Using the Rule-of-Thirds and Symmetry in your photos will make them 10x more appealing (trust me on this).

4. Play with light

    Experiment with natural and artificial light to make interesting silhouettes or to create dramatic lighting. Don’t worry about if you lose detail because you can bump up the brightness in post-processing. In both photos below, I chose to play with natural lighting and went in to post- processing to increase brightness and contrast.

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5. Avoid using the flash

The flash capabilities on most phones are horrible. Try to avoid using the flash, it makes pictures look overexposed. As you can see I tried to capture the skyline of Atlanta with my flash, and the image turned out horrible. Nothing was in focus, and the flash made the lights of the city overexposed.

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6. Patience and Persistence

Practice makes perfect. I know this has been said plenty of times, but it is important to remember this because there will be plenty of times where you will want to give up. Trust me, I have been down this road before. The first shot will not be the best shot, even for professional photographers.